Two Men in Town

As thought-provoking as it is timely, Two Men in Town resonates long after you’ve finished watching. This 1973 crime-drama is a compelling narrative that presents social issues in an easily digestible manner than in turn allows the audience to come to their own conclusions regarding the topics involved. This is the first French film I’ve seen that wasn’t an art film, and if there are more out there like this count me in.

The story follows a recent parolee, Gino (Alain Delon) whose sketchy past as a safe-cracker landed him in jail for the past decade. With the help of his prison social worker and seemingly only friend, Germaine (Jean Gabin), Gino attempts to build a new life away from world of criminal activity.

It isn’t long before his old buddies try to rope him back into the safe-cracking game, and a young Gerard Depardieu is among the goons that want him back for another job. But Gino’s life is perfect…at least at the start. A series of tragic events lead him down a path that may or may not tempt him back into the world he once knew so well. But fate once again intercedes and he finds new hope once again.

His dreams of a bright future are soon dimmed by the reappearance of the over-zealous cop who took Gino and his gang down a decade before, and the cop is determined to catch Gino at his old tricks. Can Gino overcome to obstacles set before him and win against the odds, or is the deck stacked too high against him?

Two Men in Town triumphs thanks to excellent performances and its approach to social issues still relevant today. Just to forewarn you, the film is in French with English subtitles, but that shouldn’t deter you from checking out the film if you’re intrigued by the subject matter or French cinema in general.

I highly recommend Two Men in Town, part of the Cohen Film Collection.

Two Men in Town is available NOW on Blu-ray.

Cohen Film Collection: Two Men in Town – Blu-ray Review

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